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Economics News

Students Chosen to Attend APEE Conference

Two Boise State Economics students were given the opportunity to attend the 41st Annual Meeting for The Association of Private Enterprise Education (APEE). APEE is an association of scholars from colleges and universities, public policy institutes, and industry with a common interest in studying and supporting the private enterprise system. Students are nominated to attend the conference where they present their research to various professors for the duration of the conference. The nominate Boise State students were Ceci Thunes and Kyle Johnson, and they were accompanied by Professor Allen Dalton. The conference was held in Las Vegas, Nevada April 3-5, 2016.

Kyle Johnson

Kyle Johnson

Ceci Thunes

Ceci Thunes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Samia Islam quoted in Idaho Business Review

image Samia Islam, associate professor of economics at Boise StateIdaho Business Review quoted Samia Islam on February, 4 2016 in regards to the three percent pay increase for public sector as proposed by Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter.

See article  here.

Michail Fragkias co-authors interdisciplinary research paper

Michail Fragkias co-authored an interdisciplinary research paper published in the journal ‘Urban Climate’. The paper is titled ‘A conceptual framework for an urban areas typology to integrate climate change mitigation and adaptation’ (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212095515300080) and is part of a Special Issue on ‘Building Capacity for Climate Change Adaptation in Urban Areas’
From the abstract:
“Urban areas are key sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and also are vulnerable to climate change. The recent IPCC Fifth Assessment Report illustrates a clear need for more research on urban strategies for climate change adaptation and mitigation. However, missing from the current literature on climate change and urban areas is a conceptual framework that integrates mitigation and adaptation perspectives and strategies. Because cities vary with respect to development histories, economic structure, urban form, institutional and financial capacities among other factors, it is critical to develop a framework that permits cross-city comparisons beyond simple single measures like population size.”

Undergraduate Research Competition – Las Vegas – April 3-5, 2016

Undergraduate Research Competition
Las Vegas

Research in Economics, Business, Political Science, Philosophy, History, Sociology, and Law
Association of Private Enterprise Education (APEE) Conference at Bally’s Las Vegas Hotel and Casino
Las Vegas – April 3-5, 2016

BSU Competition Submission Deadline: December 30, 2015

Submission priority will be given to topics consistent with the themes of political economy, private enterprise, entrepreneurship, economic education, and this year’s conference theme: Capitalism: Free-Market or Crony? In The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith described the economy of his day as the “mercantile” system. It consisted of government privileges for favored sectors, and onerous burdens on others. In the 20th century, Ludwig von Mises updated the Smithian analysis to deal with the modern version of the mercantile system, which he called interventionism. Mises identified corruption as “the regular effect of interventionism.” In today’s vernacular, and especially since the early 21st century financial crisis, the system has been dubbed crony capitalism. Crony capitalism is frequently linked to corruption. Free-market capitalism may be an ideal, but crony capitalism is all too real around the globe.

Boise State students are eligible to compete for a trip to Las Vegas to present their research results and attend conference activities at the Association of Private Enterprise Education Conference, April 3-5, 2016.

Information about the BSU Research Competition: The top three entries in the BSU Competition will be nominated to present their research at the APEE Conference and the three students will have their airfare, hotel accommodations, conference registration, and meals covered by a generous grant from the Charles Koch Foundation. Students will be expected to participate in conference activities. Student entries will be judged by a committee chaired by Allen Dalton (Dept. of Economics). Other committee members are Charlotte Twight and Scott Yenor (Dept. of Political Science). Any topic in Economics, Business, Political Science, Philosophy, History, Sociology, and Law are welcome. Priority will be given to entries on the conference theme of Capitalism: Free-Market or Crony?

Eligibility Requirements: (1) Applicants must be registered students at Boise State University during the fall 2015 semester. (2) Applicants must be 21 or older by April 3, 2016 (a copy of a driver’s license or other official document showing proof of age must accompany the BSU competition submission). (3) Applicants must either possess a valid US passport through the dates of the conference, or undertake arrangements to possess one by February 12, 2016 (proof of valid passport at time of the submission deadline or proof of submission of application for a passport after selection must be received by the committee). (4) Applications, along with a 600-word abstract, the complete research paper, and a provisional poster must be submitted by December 30, 2015. Applications and additional information may be obtained from Allen Dalton (allendalton@boisestate.edu). Winning students will be selected and announced by January 30, 2016.

Information about the Association of Private Enterprise Education (APEE): APEE believes that individual understanding of a society based on freedom in enterprise and one’s personal life can provide an environment within which people can fulfill their greatest potential. The Association acts as a network to provide members with information, interaction, and support in their efforts to put into action an accurate and objective understanding of private enterprise systems. APEE sponsors yearly conferences, newsletters, membership directories, consultation among members, and other programs and publications. APEE publishes the Journal of Private Enterprise. For more information about APEE and past conferences, visit www.apee.org. APEE Undergraduate Research Competitions: APEE encourages professors to nominate outstanding undergraduate research projects. Undergraduates are invited to present their research at a poster session, set up like a science fair. Participants each have an easel for a poster or other visual display highlighting their research; they talk to professors about their research as professors circulate about the room during the plenary session/reception. Awards for top undergraduate papers are presented during the general meeting luncheon.

Michail Fragkias interviewed by BBC

Is the world running out of space?

Spring 2015 Graduates honored

Economics faculty and staff celebrated the accomplishments of their Spring 2015 graduates at a reception held on May 8, 2015.  Student attendees were Andrew Williams, Bre Perrone, Mason Harp, Chris Felt, Colby Scott, Ethan Lopez, Mark Coyne, Ravyn Farber, Stephen Gustafson.  There were also many family members  and friends in attendance.

L-R (Back): Mason Harp, Stephen Gustafson, Chris Felt, Colby Scott, Andrew Williams, Mark Coyne. L-R (front): Ethan Lopez, Ravyn Farber, Bre Perrone.

L-R (Back): Mason Harp, Stephen Gustafson, Chris Felt, Colby Scott, Andrew Williams, Mark Coyne. L-R (front): Ethan Lopez, Ravyn Farber, Bre Perrone.

L-R (back): Scott Lowe, Michail Fragkias, Mason Harp, Stephen Gustafson, Chris Felt, Colby Scott, Andrew Williams, Mark Coyne, Allen Dalton, Don Holley.  L-R (middle): John Martin, Samia Islam, Zeynep Hansen. L-R (front): Charlotte Twight, Ethan Lopez, Ravyn Farber, Bre Perrone, Chris Loucks.

L-R (back): Scott Lowe, Michail Fragkias, Mason Harp, Stephen Gustafson, Chris Felt, Colby Scott, Andrew Williams, Mark Coyne, Allen Dalton, Don Holley. L-R (middle): John Martin, Samia Islam, Zeynep Hansen. L-R (front): Charlotte Twight, Ethan Lopez, Ravyn Farber, Bre Perrone, Chris Loucks.

2015-2016 Jordan Scholarship announces recipients

The recipients of the 2015-2016 Jordan Scholarship have been announced.  They are Jennifer Moore and Christopher Daigle.  These two individuals are committed to their pursuit of degree completion and in maintaining their high academic standards, working diligently and with high integrity.  Congratulations to Chris and Jennifer.

2015-2016 Jordan Scholarship recipients, Christopher Daigle and Jennifer Moore shown with Tammy Ota and Sue Lovelace, Jordan family members.

2015-2016 Jordan Scholarship recipients, Christopher Daigle and Jennifer Moore shown with Tammy Ota and Sue Lovelace, Jordan family members.

2015-2016 Jordan Scholarship Reception

2015-2016 Jordan Scholarship Reception

Boise State Economist Gets to the Root of Urban Tree Cover

By: Kathleen Tuck   Published 3:13 pm / April 24, 2015

SidewalkTree620x320

While your dad was right when he lectured that “Money doesn’t grow on trees, you know,” it may well be true that trees follow money.

A study conducted by Boise State economist Michail Fragkias and others looks at the correlation between the number of city trees and overall income levels in seven U.S. cities: Baltimore, Maryland; Los Angeles, California; New York, New York; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Raleigh, North Carolina; Sacramento, California; and Washington, D.C. Results were published at PLOS ONE and can be read at

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0122051

Michail Fragkias, Eric Torre Photos

Titled “Trees Grow on Money: Urban Tree Canopy Cover and Environmental Justice,” the study notes the increasing popularity of urban tree cover in city sustainability plans as a way to mitigate the environmental impact of human activity and to improve aesthetics.

Trees offer cooling shade and help with carbon capture. Recent research has shown that they also have lesser-known benefits, such as decreasing cognitive fatigue, improving worker attitudes and reducing stress, anger, depression and anxiety.

“As an economist, I’m interested in the relevance of ecosystem services for human well-being and the economics of land use, particularly in cities,” Fragkias said. “It seemed to me that the distribution of tree canopy in urban areas bridges those interests quite well.”

Given the current state of environmental equity, researchers expected to find more trees in higher income areas, and fewer trees in areas with predominately minority populations.

Tnww2hxbThe numbers support that African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos are more likely than whites to live in leafless neighborhoods that are highly vulnerable to the urban heat-island effect — which shady trees can mitigate. However, study results showed that race isn’t really the main factor here, money is. Simply put, wealthier neighborhoods, regardless of their ethnic makeup, are more likely to have more and denser trees.

“It’s important to know how the valuable services provided by our ecosystems are distributed across inhabited areas and experienced by different members of society,” Fragkias said. “If all cities had an awareness of the distribution of tree canopy (and the associated ecosystem services it provides) they could target programs such as tree planting and other green infrastructure projects that would help ameliorate inequity.”

Study results did vary for Los Angeles and Sacramento, where the arid climate requires that trees be irrigated in order to survive. That’s because the additional cost of watering trees can create a burden that exceeds the benefits.

Additional reading on this topic has been published in the Wall Street Journal and can be found here:

Trees in the City_ Some Streets Have It Made in the Shade – WSJ-2

 

 

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Zeynep Hansen, Scott Lowe and Wenchao Xu Published a Brief in Global Water Forum

Zeynep Hansen, Scott Lowe and Wenchao Xu published a brief review titled “Climate change, water supply, and agriculture in the arid western United States: Eighty years of agricultural census observations from Idaho” on Global Water Forum on January 26th 2014. Please follow this link to get access to the article:

Boise State Public Radio quotes Samia Islam

Samia Islam, associate professor in the Department of Economics, was quoted in a Boise State Public Radio story about a new international market under construction on the Boise Bench. Islam said urban markets like this are “fusion places” and that the experience is not just about buying and selling, but also about “being part of the community identity.”